Question: Why does my baby have spasms?

Is it normal for my baby to have spasms?

Babies may have as many as 100 spasms a day. The seizures may be more likely to happen just as the baby is waking up. Infantile spasms most often begin between 4 and 7 months, but can start any time in the first few years of life. Later onset spasms may also occur but are rare.

How do I know if my baby has infantile spasms?

Symptoms of Infantile Spasms (IS)

Stiffen their legs or “tuck them into the belly,” as if having stomach pain. Suddenly bend at the waist. Drop or bob their heads briefly. Roll their eyes back suddenly with subtle head nodding.

Are infantile spasms serious?

Infantile spasms is a complex and rare disorder that can have very serious consequences. It can lead to death in some babies, and cause intellectual disabilities and developmental problems in others. Even once the seizures are gone, the damaging brain effects can remain.

What age do infantile spasms start?

Most infants with infantile spasms develop a pattern of movements called spasms, sometimes also referred to as epileptic spasms. The most common age for these spasms to begin is between 3 and 6 months of age. They can begin earlier than 3 months and sometimes begin after 12 months of age.

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Why does my baby tense up and shake?

Moving their arms and legs all around can be one of the signs that your baby is hungry. Crying, which can also create shaking, trembling, or stiffening of the body, is also a late sign of hunger. Low blood sugar can also cause shivering in babies.

What can be mistaken for infantile spasms?

Infantile spasms are caused by a condition in a baby’s brain and include repetitive, but often subtle movements—such as jerking of the mid-section, dropping of the head, raising of the arms or wide-eyed blinks. IS can be misdiagnosed as colic, reflux, or a startle reflex.

What are the symptoms of seizures in babies?

What are the symptoms of a seizure in a child?

  • Staring.
  • Jerking movements of the arms and legs.
  • Stiffening of the body.
  • Loss of consciousness.
  • Breathing problems or stopping breathing.
  • Loss of bowel or bladder control.
  • Falling suddenly for no apparent reason, especially when associated with loss of consciousness.